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Articles

Entrepreneurial drivers, barriers and enablers of computing students: gendered perspectives from an Australian and UK university

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Pages 1892-1905 | Published online: 03 Jul 2019
 

ABSTRACT

This paper investigates computing students’ entrepreneurial intentions, motivations, recognisable barriers and encouragements towards entrepreneurship, with a focus on gender. Two universities, one in Australia and one in the UK (n = 247), were used as locations for the research to consider two distinct contexts. In each university there were similarly high levels of interest in entrepreneurship among computing students, however some significant differences in responses were found, especially between male and female participants. Job flexibility was a strong motivation for the UK-based female participants; while female participants at the Australian university identified internal barriers (such as lack of confidence and experience). Enablers to entrepreneurial activity were identified, including access to incubators and academic support. Directing such support towards computing students, while recognising gender differences, could increase interest in, and take-up of, entrepreneurship. Recommendations are made regarding how universities can best support would-be entrepreneurs and encourage inclusive entrepreneurship into the future.

Acknowledgements

We thank Rob Gresham and the SRHE for enabling financial support and advice. We acknowledge the support of Professors Margaret Jollands, Kay Latham, Liz Bacon and Lachlan McKinnon, Dr Cate Gribble, Dr Mark Rahimi, Dr Tanja Capic and Cilla Richards.

Disclosure statement

No potential conflict of interest was reported by the authors.

Correction Statement

This article has been republished with minor changes. These changes do not impact the academic content of the article.

Additional information

Funding

This work was funded by an SRHE Research Award [grant number RA1616].

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